Food and farm webinar roundup

What is a webinar, you ask? A webinar is essentially an online educational video that typically discusses a specific topic. Many organizations listed in our Farmer Research Network online search tool provide this type of resource to assist agricultural producers. While some of these webinars require advanced registration, other videos are archived for farmers and ranchers to watch anytime! From conservation tips and tools to learning to start a farm, there are plenty of agriculture webinars available to farmers. Here are some trusted websites with webinars that can help:

National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (ATTRA) 

ATTRA, a division of the National Center for Appropriate Technology, maintains an ongoing archive of its webinars focused on different areas of sustainable agriculture. Want to learn how to build a better relationship with your lamb processor? How about organic farm conservation? With 55 archived webinars and a growing library, this is the site to visit for all things sustainable.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Many branches of the USDA developed webinars to assist and educate producers. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) created a library of various videos related to conservation. These webinars span topics ranging from “Planning for Floodplain and Riparian Area Special Environmental Concerns” to “Conserving Pollinators While Addressing Other Resource Concerns.” Each webinar is hosted by a lineup of experts, many of which are USDA employees.

The USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) developed a series of webinars that air twice a month from January through June of 2014 focusing on farm to school programs. All of these videos are archived in an FNS library in addition to a host of other webinars from the past two years.

The USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service created an ongoing series of fruit and vegetable webinars archived here.

The USDA’s Forest Service developed the “Invasive Plants—Issues, Challenges and Discoveries Webinar Series” intended for landowners, agriculture professionals and scientists. This seven-part series will run through May, 2014, and information on each can be found here.

National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC)

While NSAC doesn’t have a library of archived webinars, the organization hosts several training webinars throughout the year. These training sessions cover many different topics, like how to market your agricultural business through building connections with the media or this overview of cover crops based on updated USDA termination guidelines. To stay up-to-date on the latest NSAC webinar, check out its website or like the organization on Facebook.

Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE)

The different SARE branches created varying series of webinars. North Central SARE offers webinars focusing on greenhouse energy, cover crops, building local sustainable foods and irrigation energy.  Southern SARE provides a webinar on “Grafting for Disease Management in Organic Tomato Production.” Farmers and ranchers can also order archived webinar series from Northeast SARE focusing on marketing for profit or farmland transfer and access.

Women, Food and Agriculture Network (WFAN)

WFAN has a library of webinars that focus on empowering female farmers. These webinars cover a diverse range of topics within this realm, but each is meant to give women the tools they need to succeed. That may be on a policy level, such as the “Policy—When The Personal Becomes Political” video, which engages women leaders to explain how individuals can further policy goals. There are also more abstract videos, like this webinar that discusses the power of blogging.

Farm Commons 

Farm Commons creates and archives webinars focused on dealing with legal issues that can impact farm operations. The organization supplements these videos with downloadable resources. These webinars cover topics relevant to beginning and advanced growers alike, with titles ranging from “ Starting a Farm” to “Community Supported Agriculture Legal Issues.”

Rodale Institute 

While the Rodale Institute hasn’t released any webinars yet, stay tuned! The organization is in the works of creating a schedule of webinar trainings. In the meantime, Rodale developed a page with helpful videos from its conferences and workshops.

 

 

Resource Partners Event Roundup

Center for Rural Affairs

April: The Center for Rural Affairs (CFA) has two events this month. In partnership with The Farmer Veteran Coalition and the Drake University Agricultural Law Center, CFA is hosting the WI Farmer Veterans Tour and Workshop on April 12.  Veterans and family members interested in farming careers are invited to attend this event at Growing Power Farms in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A tour of the farm and its composting and aquaponics system will be followed by workshops at the farm. Admission is free and seating is limited so register here to reserve your spot!

Also on the 12th is the Farm Dreams Workshop. Women interested in farming and ranching will be able to participate in a four-hour workshop to get a feel for the professions and learn how to take the first steps to enter the field. The workshop takes place at the Syracuse Public Library in Syracuse, Nebraska and costs $5. Participants must register in advance and can contact virginiam@cfra.org or call 402.992.5134.

May: On May 10 the Farm Business Financing Workshop for Women will take place at the Lewis and Clark Center in Nebraska City, Nebraska. The event is an intensive business planning and farm-financing course to help women farmers and ranchers design a business plan and access financing for agricultural operations. Contact virginiam@cfra.org or call 402.992.5134 to register in advance. The event costs $5 and lunch is included.

June: For those thinking about venturing into the farmers market business, the June 7 event Selling at Farmers Markets gives tips and tricks to find the best location, customer base, product, presentation and price to maximize success. Located in Ashland, Nebraska, this event costs $5 and includes lunch. Contact virginiam@cfra.org or call 402.992.5134 to register.

On June 21, Selling Through a CSA will teach women getting started in gardening, farming, and ranching about the advantages of selling through a community supported agriculture system. The workshop will take place at the Webermeier Public Library in Milford, Nebraska. Contact virginiam@cfra.org or call 402.992.5134 to register in advance 

National Center for Appropriate Technology (ATTRA)

April: On April 25 the National Center for Appropriate Technology (ATTRA) will host Entering the Institutional Food Market. Montana farmers, ranchers and processors will be provided information and technical assistance.  Register for this $10 event here by April 20 to reserve a spot.

June: With Montana adopting a new energy code requiring blower door and duct tightness testing for all new homes, there are emerging business opportunities in residential energy efficiency. On June 2, the Home Energy Rater and Energy Star Training in Missoula, Montana will provide comprehensive energy auditor training with an emphasis on new residential construction and the Home Energy Raters rating process. Participants will be prepared to take the tests required to become a certified Home Energy Rater, a Northwest Energy Star Homes Verifier and a Northwest Energy Star Homes Performance Tester. Register online and click here for more details 

Rodale Institute

April: Interested in having your own chickens? On April 26 the Rodale Institute is hosting the Backyard Chickens event to educate those looking to learn how to make chickens a part of their family and get fresh eggs everyday. Participants will learn about cost, breeding, housing, feeding, protecting and handling chickens, as well as leave with a list of recommended books and resources on how to complete this project efficiently. Register ahead of time here.

The Greenhorns

 April: . The future of farmland is unclear. In the next 20 years an expected 400 million acres of U.S. farmland will change hands. On April 26 and 27 Our Land: A Symposium on Farmland Access in the 21st Century at UC Berkeley will delve into the historical context, long-term implications and economic impact and stewardship potential of this impending transition.

May: On May 3 The Greenhorns is hosting Farmland Seekers to provide technical assistance around land and capital access and transition. Attendees will learn essential tools for building and navigating relationships with lenders, investors, landowners, partners, boards, conservation organizations, neighbors and more!

Click here to find out more about our Resource Partners! Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more news about upcoming events and conferences!

WFAN launches new farmer forum

The Women, Food and Agriculture Network recently launched a new farmer forum for women. The WFAN Online Community is designed for farmers to stay connected and freely discuss a number of different topics related to agriculture free of charge.

Once registered, a user can choose which demographic best suits herself from four provided options: everyone, advocates, farmers or landowners. From there, the forum is intended to help users make more informed, practical decisions through the knowledge and experience of others in a way that strengthens the farmer community.

For more information and to check out the new site, visit: http://network.wfan.org.

To find out more about WFAN, click here to read a recent Growing Change story about the organization.

Growing Change: Women, Food and Agriculture Network

Women are often at a disadvantage in the male-dominated world of agriculture. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only one out of every six full-time farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers in the U.S. is a woman. But the number of women in agriculture is rapidly increasing, even while the total number of U.S. farmers is starkly declining. The Census of Agriculture found that the amount of women in the field increased by 30 percent from 2002 to 2007.

With those numbers comes a slew of challenges for women farmers—and that’s precisely why The Women, Food and Agriculture Network (WFAN) was created.

Farms and Ranches Operated by Women

WFAN began as a working group in 1994 following the 4thInternational Conference on Women in China, where a small group of people found that they were the first working group to specifically represent women in agriculture. Since then, that small group has grown into the full service organization it is today, offering networking, education and leadership development to American women involved or interested in agriculture. “The importance behind the group was and still is empowering women, but in the realm of healthy food and farming,” Executive Director Leigh Adcock explains.

Leigh shares that female farmers experience three kinds of isolation: geographical isolation from residing in rural areas, cultural isolation related to working in a male-dominated field and the social isolation related to both of these conditions. WFAN stands as an outlet to provide support for women facing social stigma, while also assisting with problems that all farmers face, such as access to land or capital or adopting conservation practices.

Farm Aid first teamed up with WFAN in 2008, following a devastating flood in the Midwest that threatened farm families across the region. After connecting with our farm advocate, Joel Morton, the two organizations joined forces to build a coalition of groups working on relief efforts. Farm Aid President Willie Nelson visited Leigh shortly after to deliver a $10,000 check in support of that critical work. Since then, WFAN remains one of Farm Aid’s trusted referrals in our Farmer Resource Network.

Willie Nelson & Leigh AdcockWillie Nelson meets with Leigh Adcock to discuss helping Midwestern farmers cope with flooding in 2008.

WFAN works not only with experienced farmers, but also farmwives, non-farming landowners, beginning farmers and women connected to agriculture that are interested in leadership roles. Its three programs are designed to address the different needs of these women: Harvesting our Potential, Women Caring for the Land, and Plate to Politics.

Harvesting Our Potential is the oldest program WFAN offers. This experiential program connects women interested in entering farming with internship opportunities where they can work on an Iowa farm under the leadership of a skilled mentor for 8 to 12 weeks. The organization continues to provide this unique service that is mutually beneficial to both the aspiring and experienced farmers for networking and business planning.

In the state of Iowa, where WFAN is headquartered, women own or co-own about 50 percent of farmland. Women Caring for the Land, is a conservation manual for non-operator landowners, catered to women with any level of education. Though comprehensible and accessible for women of all ages, it is specifically designed as a useful tool to reach the growing population of landowners 65-years-old or older, to ensure ongoing conservation of their land.

Plate to Politics is an emerging addition to WFAN’s services in collaboration with the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service, designed to connect women with leadership roles nationwide “from the farmhouse to the White House,” as Leigh puts it. Today, women win elections at the same rate as men. The only reason more women don’t run for office, Leigh maintains, is because they aren’t asked to or don’t consider themselves viable candidates. Plate for Politics acts as a platform to empower women involved in food and agriculture with the tools needed to confidently step into leadership roles. “I think empowering women is really crucial,” Leigh shares. “Having women involved in food and farm policy is going to change the way we farm and the way we treat our land and our health.”

Farm Aid recently supported the Plate for Politics program with a $5,000 grant. This grant enabled WFAN to create a series of six webinars available online to educate women on how they can serve as food and farm leaders.

With the recent rapid growth of the organization, WFAN hopes to assess its program areas for potential new projects, such as training on how to access subsidies to health care.

To stay connected with the women WFAN works with, the organization hosts potlucks and an annual conference. This year, the 4th National Conference for Women in Sustainable Agriculture will take place from November 6 – 8 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Learn More

Growing Change — Farmer Veteran Coalition

From serving the nation in the military to serving the nation food and fiber, many U.S. veterans are returning from combat to jobs in agriculture. Farming—with its taxing schedule and intense physical labor demands—is a good fit for such a hardworking and dedicated group.

Today, there are over 23 million veterans in the United States. Agriculture can provide an important source of income for veterans, particularly at a time when unemployment rates have skyrocketed. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, throughout 2012 veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan had an unemployment rate of 9.9 percent—compared to about 7.9 percent for the general U.S. population. Particularly hard hit are female post-9/11 veterans with an unemployment rate of 12.5 percent. All in all, there are more than 200,000 unemployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans in this country.

That’s where the Farmer Veteran Coalition (FVC) comes in. Their mission is to mobilize veterans to work in sustainable farming jobs, creating a smooth transition into civilian life. Michael O’Gorman founded the organization and is its current leader, with 40-plus years under his belt as an organic farmer. He started FVC because of two converging trends: the aging farmer population in the U.S., and the high unemployment rate of veterans. Helping recent veterans find farming jobs hit the two issues with one stone, and FVC was created in 2008. The organization has taken off and now works with 1,000 veterans in 48 states.

Farmer Veteran Coalition

Tia Christopher is chief of staff at FVC. She says that while some of the organization’s veterans grew up on farms or have an agricultural connection, this is not universally the case. “Some of them get a brilliant idea that they want to be farmers, even though they have no experience whatsoever,” she says. They come from different professional backgrounds, geographic locations and military experiences. FVC finds a unique opportunity for each returning veteran through one of its many programs.

FVC is chock full of programming, from farm retreats, to financial planning and business courses, to a small grants program that helps aspiring farmer veterans build up their initial infrastructure. Another FVC program is the farm equipment exchange and donation program, or FEED, where individuals or dealers can donate used or new farm equipment to the organization. This equipment is given to disabled or financially challenged veteran farmers.

The FVC staff members represent all of the military branches (except for the Coast Guard). Being veterans themselves makes the organization’s work personal. “For us as veterans they’re our peers, they’re our brothers and sisters and so we really care about the people who contact us,” Tia says. This dedication and passion shows with each and every veteran they help.

One veteran in particular who stands out for Tia is Mickey Clayton, a single mother who is half Lakota Indian and half Puerto Rican. She is also an Army combat veteran who sustained a severe leg injury in Iraq. Having grown up on a South Dakota reservation among sheep, Mickey became mesmerized by the nomadic Awassi sheepherders in Iraq. Upon returning home, she decided to start a farm with FVC’s help. Now Mickey raises unusual breeds—that garner higher prices—like Navajo-Churro Sheep and Muscovy Ducks on Dot Ranch in Northwestern Oregon. She is one of FVC’s Bob Woodruff Farming Fellows, a program that has helped her secure adaptive farming equipment, making it possible for her to wrangle sheep even with her injury. And if being a single mother and raising all of those breeds wasn’t enough, Mickey also has a successful Etsy business selling her wool.

With Dot Ranch thriving, Mickey is now able to give back. She’s an ambassador for the FVC at Native American sheepherder events, and has ushered other vets into the FVC family. Tia says giving back like this demonstrates the program’s success. “Success for us honestly is when the veterans are able to mentor their peers, employ their peers, and pay it forward.”

The FVC has a strong connection to Farm Aid’s work of supporting the family farmer. Farm Aid was one of FVC’s earliest supporters, granting them $17,000 since 2009 to support their programming, most recently supporting their work training more than 100 veterans in farming skills, offering business planning to 31 veterans, and helping veterans secure legal counseling and disaster assistance in times of crisis. But that’s not all; Farmer Veteran Coalition has a huge presence at the Farm Aid concert each year, as part of the farmer meetings that take place before the concert and as part of the HOMEGROWN Village at the concert. FVC brings farmer veterans to Farm Aid from across the country to network with other farmers and spread the mission of the organization. Tia finds the jovial spirit of the Farm Aid concert conducive for recruiting would-be veteran farmers. “It’s really cool because we get awesome mentors and farmers to sign on with us when we’re at Farm Aid each year,” she says. Last year they recruited a veteran mushroom farmer and an entomologist.

Tia and her colleagues see the importance of the work they do everyday—not only finding employment for veterans, but also encouraging them to keep their spirits up and put their strong sense of service to use. Each and every farmer veteran motivates and inspires Tia. “It is often stated that farming and the military are two of the hardest professions; at FVC we believe that it takes a special type of person to do either, let alone both. I think the quality that’s most important for both is determination, and our farmer veterans have it in droves.” Helping military heroes and growing new farmers makes the Farmer Veteran Coalition a true Farmer Resource Network provider hero!

Learn More

Photo above provided courtesy of Jim Carroll Photography.

Farmer Veteran Coalition’s 2nd annual conference for women veterans

The Farmer Veteran Coalition will host “Empowering Women Veterans: Success in Agriculture Business and Well-Being” in Louisville, Kentucky on November 14-17. This is the FVC’s 2nd annual national conference dedicated to women veterans in agriculture. The FVC invites all women veterans, active duty and women farming with veterans to the free event at the Hyatt Regency. The conference will bring together over 100 women from around the nation to build community while learning business skills needed to achieve entrepreneurial goals.

Click here for more information. Click here to register for free and reserve a room at the Hyatt Regency hotel, or email events@farmvetco.org for more information.

Sustainable Farming For Women, By Women

Coming up in August, MOSES, The MidWest Organic and Sustainable Education Service, will be hosting a series of workshops for women. In Her Boots: Sustainable Farming for Women, by Women includes on-farm workshops that provide attendees with skill-building and networking experiences and inspiration to support them in launching a food or farm business. Workshops will be taught by seasoned and beginning female farmers and topics include everything from how to run farm and food-based enterprises and value-added businesses, to land stewardship, risk management through income diversification, and integrating children and family.

Space is very limited, so sign up for workshops as soon as possible—and take advantage of the early bird discount! Click here for more information, or to reserve your spot.

August Workshops include:

Canoe Creek Produce
Sunday, August 4, 2013 | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  | Decorah, Iowa  | $35; $50 after 7-31-13
Discuss farm diversification, beginning farmer challenges and resources, and farmstay start-ups with a panel of experienced farmers plus representatives of FoodCorps and MOSES.

Dancing Winds Farms
Thursday, August 8, 2013  | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  |  Kenyon, Minnesota | $35; $50 after 7-31-13
A panel of farmers discusses diversification through farmstays, farming as a single woman, starting farms mid-life, beginning farmer land access & financing, cheesemaking, raising goats, and more!

Scotch Hill Farm
Sunday, August 18, 2013  | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  |  Brodhead, Wisconsin | $35; $50 after 8-9-13
Learn from women who run successful CSA operations through the Fair Share Coalition. Topics include starting

Veteran Farming Programs

Nearly a million military servicemen and servicewomen come from rural areas across the country. Upon returning from service they can use their great sense of service to benefit farms. Farming is also empowering, giving these servicemen and women a sense of accomplishment – truly seeing the fruits of their labor. The following programs work with veterans, creating opportunities for them to find meaningful careers in the farming and agriculture.

Farmer Veteran Coalition

The Farmer Veteran Coalition uses food production as a means to offer purpose, opportunity, as well as physical and psychological benefits for veterans. A majority of the veterans the Coalition works with served recently in Iraq and Afghanistan, but the organization also serves military veterans of all eras and branches.

 

Veterans to Farmers

Veterans to Farmers operates with a goal to return the family farm to a prominent position on the American landscape. To do this they train and help American veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The organization specifically works with greenhouse agriculture. Their national training center is equipped and ready to teach aeroponic growing methods, greenhouse maintenance and construction, as well as business planning. The food grown at the training center is sold through a CSA. Upon completion of a 12-week training course, the organization helps veterans find employment and work with greenhouses.

 

Veteran Organic Farming Program

Delaware Valley College’s veteran organic farming program was originally designed for veterans, but because of high demand is now also open to non-veterans too. The college’s program runs in conjunction with the Rodale Institute in Kutztown, Pa., and consists of a one-year, 36-credit certificate in organic farming. Courses include: animal science, marketing, plant disease diagnosis and entomology, as well as hands on farming experience at Rodale. The college is a Yellow Ribbon School, meaning that veterans who are eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill will have up to 100% of their tuition paid.

 

Center for Rural Affairs Veteran Farmers Project

The Center for Rural Affairs’ Veteran Farmers Project offers training, individual help on finances and production, and a support helpline for veterans wishing to become farmers. The goal of the project is to create farm businesses that can tap into high value markets so that returning veterans can reintegrate into America’s rural communities. Last year the program held a 90-minute webinar that is available for viewing here. Additional videos that show a Marine veteran who operates a cattle business, and one that highlights Common Good Farm are also available here.

Available Funding for Rural Energy Programs

2013 funding is available for the Rural Energy for America (REAP) program from the USDA. This program gives financial assistance in form of loan guarantees and grants to farmers and rural small businesses for conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Funds are also available for energy audits and assessments. Some eligible REAP projects include: solar panels, anaerobic digesters, installation of irrigation pumps or ventilation systems, as well as conducting energy audits and feasibility studies for such projects.

All grant and combination grant and loan proposals are due April 30th. Applications for feasibility studies are also due April 30th. Guaranteed loan applications (that don’t have a grant component) are due July 15th.

For more information about REAP, visit the USDA’s REAP portal, as well as the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition’s REAP page.

Details on how to apply for REAP funding available in the Federal Register.

For help with the application process, contact National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT).

Upcoming Food Sovereignty Summit in Wisconsin

The Oneida Nation, First Nations Development Institute, Intertribal Agriculture Council and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College invite you to this year’s Food Sovereignty Summit. Learn from Native nonprofits and Native nations about best practices in the areas of food sovereignty and food systems.

This year’s summit will be held April 15-18 in Green Bay, Wisconsin.
 
The summit offers three professional training tracks (though attendees can attend sessions in multiple tracks): 

Track 1: Sustainable Agricultural Practices

Track 2: Community Outreach and Development

Track 3: Business Management, Finance and Marketing

Registration rates are as follows:

Student–$80.00 for full conference
Food Producers–$100.00 for 1 day /
$150.00 for full conference
Non-Food Producers–$150.00 for 1 day / $250.00 for full conference
—–

Click here for more information and to see a summit schedule.